Facial technologies – Softwave http://softwave.info/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 22:46:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://softwave.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Facial technologies – Softwave http://softwave.info/ 32 32 Diving Deep Into Deepfakes: Frighteningly Real And Sometimes Used For The Wrong Things https://softwave.info/diving-deep-into-deepfakes-frighteningly-real-and-sometimes-used-for-the-wrong-things/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 22:02:53 +0000 https://softwave.info/diving-deep-into-deepfakes-frighteningly-real-and-sometimes-used-for-the-wrong-things/ Facebook also said in June that it had developed AI software to not only identify deepfake media, but also to understand where it came from. In July, AI Singapore launched a five-month competition to design solutions that will help detect fake media, with entrants having access to datasets of original and fake multimedia videos with […]]]>

Facebook also said in June that it had developed AI software to not only identify deepfake media, but also to understand where it came from.

In July, AI Singapore launched a five-month competition to design solutions that will help detect fake media, with entrants having access to datasets of original and fake multimedia videos with audio.

Entrants will need to create AI models that estimate the likelihood of a given video being fake, with the winner – expected to be announced in January of next year – earning S $ 100,000 and a seed grant of $ 300,000. S to further develop their solutions. using Singapore as a base.

Beyond the use of AI, Assoc Prof Li said deepfake technologists should also work closely with regulators. “You want to impose laws that essentially prevent illegal use of this type of technology,” he added.

PASSAGE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC

However, Assoc Prof Li pointed out that deepfakes can be used in a positive way, for example to enhance visual effects, including aging in videos. He is currently working with high-end production studios on films using 4K AI synthesis effects, primarily focused on faces.

“One of the technologies we’re developing here in Pinscreen is basically augmenting traditional computer graphics with high-fidelity neural rendering that can run in real-time, so we’ve improved virtual avatars for various applications,” a- he declared.

“It can be used for games, it can be used for creating virtual assistants, but also for very realistic telepresence applications where people can immerse themselves in virtual worlds.”

Assoc Prof Li predicted that deepfake technology will eventually become mainstream, given that people already live in a digital society with various social media tools to change their appearance.

“Once these things look better, people will start to use these technologies differently and go above and beyond what is possible,” he said.

“So maybe you don’t even want to be yourself, you want to be someone else. That, I think, will definitely be an ability that will be available.”


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Improving the hospital experience for children using a social robot https://softwave.info/improving-the-hospital-experience-for-children-using-a-social-robot/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 15:12:00 +0000 https://softwave.info/improving-the-hospital-experience-for-children-using-a-social-robot/ In this interview, News-Medical talks to Dr. Justin Wagner about Robin, the social companion robot, and how he improves children’s hospital experiences. Can you tell us about your work and tell us what led you to carry out this study? Robin is a social companion robot designed to help children in healthcare settings. In Armenia, […]]]>

In this interview, News-Medical talks to Dr. Justin Wagner about Robin, the social companion robot, and how he improves children’s hospital experiences.

Can you tell us about your work and tell us what led you to carry out this study?

Robin is a social companion robot designed to help children in healthcare settings. In Armenia, where it was developed, it was previously studied in outpatient clinics and has shown promise in reducing anxiety levels in children.

Before the pandemic, we were already interested in bringing the most engaging technologies to support our pediatric patients. Our team met the creators of Robin and we were struck by the robot’s capabilities, which seemed to represent the most advanced social support robotics we’ve heard.

We designed a study to introduce Robin into a pediatric inpatient setting, and we assembled a team of scientists, behavioral health experts, and child life specialists. The timing of the pandemic was fortuitous and accelerated the research plan.

As restrictions for visitors were put in place and emotional support services were limited during a time of uncertainty surrounding the transmission of COVID-19, we figured Robin could provide a crucial service by ramping up the already incredible work. of our specialists in the life of the child.

Image Credit: UCLA Health

Your study found that communicating with children via a social robot improved their hospital experience. How was this study designed?

Under the circumstances of the pandemic, personal visits were restricted and remote interactions were becoming the new normal. We designed our study to compare the type of emotional support that Child Life specialists could provide through two types of interactions: video chat with a Child Life specialist via a tablet versus telepresence with Child Life specialists projecting via Robin the Robot.

Children and their parents participated in surveys on the positive and negative affect of the child (conscious manifestations of emotion). Specialists from Child Life also participated in a focus group to discuss their perceptions of the benefits or challenges of using Robin with their patients in the hospital.

How did you analyze your data and determine that the robot was having a positive effect on children’s experiences?

The questions in our survey of children and their parents consisted of the validated Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), which we assessed before and after each visit. We compared the changes in each child’s positive and negative affect between those who received a tablet encounter and those who received a visit from Robin.

The PANAS scale was valuable in that we could assess the effects of each type of visit on positive and negative emotional states. While an increase in positive affect is a great result, a simultaneous decrease in negative affect is even better.

Why do you think the presence of the robot has improved the children’s hospital experience so much?

The way we designed the study allowed us to see the effectiveness with which the specialists at Child Life provide emotional support. When they operated the robot, their effects were magnified. While we are unfortunately unable to conclude from our data the exact reasons for these effects, there are a few that I suspect.

On the one hand, I think the children were more involved with the physical presence of a life-size being in the room rather than the 2-dimensional projection of a video chat. Robin also has a whimsy factor. The smooth frame, glossy white surface and soft animated facial features are enchanting.

Robin the robot on Fox11

How did this method allow children to have more control over their hospital experience?

I have to thank the Child Life specialists for developing an entire character for the robot, a naive being from an alien planet who is here to learn more about Earth. The kids taught Robin where they live, the songs they love, and their favorite dance moves.

I think the children felt comfortable sharing and confiding in this curious companion. They were the experts in this relationship, a role they rarely get to experience in the hospital.

How did the positive effects spread to families and healthcare workers?

Our most statistically compelling finding was that patients’ parents perceived a 75% reduction in negative affect after a visit with Robin and no change in negative affect after a visit with a tablet. For me, this is an incredibly significant discovery.

For my patients, a reassured parent is just as important as any surgery I perform. In Child Life focus groups, specialists identified that Robin gave them a greater sense of engagement, intimacy with their patients, patient-centered care and ease of infection control measures. while they were providing their services.

Can you give us some information about the robot, Robin, and how it was developed? How difficult is the operation of the robot?

Robin was developed in Armenia by Expper Technologies, Inc. Its creators intended Robin to provide companionship and entertainment for pediatric patients who may be anxious in healthcare settings. They designed the robot to be 4 feet tall with a curved frame to allow for easy hugging. They designed his face to have big, sympathetic eyes and fitted him with a voice modulator so that Robin would talk to his mate with a child’s voice.

The robot comes with a remote-controlled software suite that allows its operator to move its wheelbase, or project different emotional expressions, show videos or move its face panel. Specialists at Child Life found that the biggest challenges included a learning curve and time commitment required to develop the robot character and control it remotely in real time.

Expper hopes to develop future iterations of Robin driven by an artificial intelligence engine capable of fully autonomous conversation. Robin currently has the ability to recognize and calculate the emotional state projected by his mate’s facial expression, although we chose not to study this characteristic in our pilot study.

The world has undergone a big change to use remote interaction more often in the wake of the pandemic. How could this study impact the future of doctor-patient interaction?

I see Robin as a creative way to break down barriers to sensitive communication during the pandemic and beyond. Social robots like Robin can be deployed in any healthcare facility to improve access to care through telepresence, or to provide emotional support to those who need it most. As a pilot, our study was the first of what will hopefully be many next steps to demonstrate how social robotics benefits healthcare.

Importantly, we have shown that, even under the dramatic circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic, Robin the robot is increasing and improving the hard work of people who treat families at Mattel Children’s Hospital. This can and should be replicated and studied further in other centers.

How could these robots become an integral part of hospital pediatric care and do you think this type of practice will become commonplace in our future?

Robin made it possible for our Child Life Specialists to engage with children who were otherwise unreachable, either due to emotional factors such as fear, anxiety and prior trauma, or due to physical barriers. such as strict infection control measures. Even in our well-endowed hospital, child life specialists are in great demand.

I suspect we’ll see robots like Robin providing telepresence visits to children in contexts like these where resources for emotional support are otherwise limited or cumbersome.

Robot in hospital

Image Credit: Phonlamai Photo / Shutterstock.com

How does robotics, in general, improve and help the medical industry? How will their influence evolve over the next few years?

The fantasy factor is applicable in several aspects of medical care. Robots are used in some settings for the intelligent transport of materials in hospitals, to augment a surgeon’s hands and instruments during difficult operations, and like Robin for emotional support. Those who receive emotional support are in their infancy, providing rudimentary functions and physical presence.

As artificial intelligence evolves over the next few years, its integration with robotics will lead to an explosion of innovative ways to increase the experience of providing and receiving medical care. Robots can help us educate us about the effectiveness of our care, provide us with more sophisticated assistance in surgical procedures, and extend the reach of our highest quality healthcare to those in remote areas with less access.

What is the next step in this study?

Now that we have demonstrated the feasibility of introducing Robin as a component of pediatric inpatient care, we are looking to broaden our scope. We aim to determine how Robin’s enhanced facial expression recognition features can be used to improve emotional support.

We intend to increase the number of interactions with patients so that we can draw more detailed conclusions about the extent to which robots increase emotional support. We will also be looking at other environments within our healthcare system to determine which ones need it most, such as infusion centers, x-ray rooms, and even adult and geriatric care facilities.

Where can readers find more information?

About Dr Justin Wagner

I’m a pediatric surgeon at Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA. I am board certified in Pediatric Surgery and Surgery by the American Board of Surgery and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.Dr Justin Wagner

I am an assistant professor and co-chair of the surgical clerkship at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. My academic interests are in multimodal and comprehensive pediatric surgical care, national and international surgical training, and innovation and multimedia in medical education.


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UK schools start using facial recognition on children paying for lunch, raising privacy concerns https://softwave.info/uk-schools-start-using-facial-recognition-on-children-paying-for-lunch-raising-privacy-concerns/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 10:07:30 +0000 https://softwave.info/uk-schools-start-using-facial-recognition-on-children-paying-for-lunch-raising-privacy-concerns/ A group of schools in the UK started using facial recognition software on Monday to verify children’s identities when paying for school meals. Nine schools in North Ayrshire in Scotland have said using the technology is faster and more hygienic than paying with cards or fingerprint scanners amid the COVID-19 pandemic. More schools in the […]]]>

A group of schools in the UK started using facial recognition software on Monday to verify children’s identities when paying for school meals.

Nine schools in North Ayrshire in Scotland have said using the technology is faster and more hygienic than paying with cards or fingerprint scanners amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

More schools in the UK are expected to use the technology.

The keeper reported the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), an independent information rights body in the UK, said it would contact North Ayrshire Council and urged a “less intrusive” approach in the process. whenever possible.

An ICO spokesperson said organizations using facial recognition technology must comply with data protection law.

“Data protection law provides additional protections for children, and organizations should carefully consider the necessity and proportionality of collecting biometric data before doing so,” they said.

“Organizations should consider using a different approach if the same goal can be achieved in a less intrusive way.”

Data storage

According to the North Ayrshire Council, 97% of children or their parents had consented to the use of facial recognition in schools.

Schools use a membership system that parents must agree to and can also use a PIN code for payment verification.

Children’s biometric data is stored in an encrypted form and the data is deleted after the child leaves school.

“It’s the fastest way to recognize someone at the checkout,” David Swanston, managing director of CRB Cunninghams, the company that supplied the system, told the Financial Times.

He told the newspaper that the average transaction time using the system was five seconds per student.

“In a high school, you have about 25 minutes to potentially serve 1,000 students. So we need fast flow at the point of sale ”.

Standardize identity checks

Silkie Carlo of the British campaign group Big Brother Watch told the Financial Times that the technology was useless in schools.

“It’s standardizing biometric identity checks for something mundane. You don’t have to resort to the airport style. [technology] for children who eat their lunch, ”he told the newspaper.

Schools in the United States have been installing facial recognition technologies in schools for the past few years for security purposes.

Meanwhile, the Moscow Metro has introduced a facial recognition payment system, raising concerns that the technology is being used to identify protesters and political opponents of President Vladimir Putin’s government.

In early October, the European Parliament called for a ban on technology in public spaces and stricter safeguards for police use of artificial intelligence, arguing that the technology could lead to discrimination.


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Technology, police and racial prejudice https://softwave.info/technology-police-and-racial-prejudice/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:13:12 +0000 https://softwave.info/technology-police-and-racial-prejudice/ From Palantir to Ring, body cameras and GPS databases, technology has transformed the police and incorporated the biases of its creators. Why is this important: Those advances can combat but also promote racial discrimination. From Palantir to Ring, body cameras and GPS databases, technology has transformed the police and incorporated the biases of its creators. […]]]>

From Palantir to Ring, body cameras and GPS databases, technology has transformed the police and incorporated the biases of its creators.

Why is this important: Those advances can combat but also promote racial discrimination.

Details: George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police was caught on cellphone video of a teenager. Images of a white officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck have sparked global protests and a national toll.

  • The video has gone viral on various social media platforms as it has been viewed and shared millions of times.
  • Darnella Frazier was later awarded a special mention by the Pulitzer Prize jury.

Yes, but: Law enforcement also uses technology that critics say reinforces racial prejudice.

Facial recognition: Law enforcement has long used forms of facial recognition technology, but in recent years better technology has been adopted by departments in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and other cities.

  • Forms of biometric security can confirm an individual’s identity using faces in photos and videos or in real time. A 2016 study by Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy & Technology revealed that one in two American adults are part of a law enforcement facial recognition network.
  • But activists say technology can misidentifying people with dark skin and violate privacy rights. A coalition of nearly 70 civil rights and defense groups in June urged Congress to ban technology in certain places.

Monitoring applications: Home security products, like Amazon’s Ring and Google’s Nest video doorbells, allow residents to record images and video footage at their doorstep, but also from nearby sidewalks and streets.

  • Neighbors, Ring’s affiliated crime reporting app, allows people to upload images that sometimes misidentify themselves. people of color walking dogs.
  • Users also posted racist language to describe black and Latino residents. Although the Neighbors app prohibits harassment and bullying, it seems impossible to effectively stop these issues with existing monitoring.
  • Ring has partnerships with approximately 1,800 US police departments that can request images from camera of Ring doorbells without warrant. The company declined to say how many users had footage obtained by the police.
  • The American Civil Liberties Union has stated that such a system comes down to spying on residents and called the growing partnerships between these apps and law enforcement troubling.

Real-time crime centers: A growing number of law enforcement agencies are launching surveillance centers so that officers can use a growing range of GPS, surveillance and database technologies.

  • Centers operate as central nodes and control rooms for automated license plate readers, gunfire detection, real-time social media monitoring, predictive policing algorithms and a network of video cameras.
  • The Atlas of Surveillance project, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada at Reno have identified more than 80 of these centers in 29 states.
  • Critics say the centers allow police to unnecessarily monitor peaceful protests, bike races or other large gatherings of people of color.
  • “Basically they can record all of our associations and where we go, who we see, where we have slept, over time, because they record all the location data,” Tessa D’Arcangelew, organization program manager at the ACLU of Northern California, told KTXL-TV in Sacramento, California.

Police Police: Some mobile phone apps seek to stop rather than just document deadly police encounters with people of color, including notifying family and lawyers of potential violations in real time.

  • The Cop Watch Video Recorder The app opens with Siri on iPhones, automatically starting filming and sending footage to the cloud. The app films in real time in case the policeman grabs or breaks the phone.
  • The Legal equalizer The app captures encounters with police once the user is arrested, automatically alerting relatives and providing basic legal information on the spot.
  • The Mobile justice The app, available in all 50 states, logs and submits police incidents directly to the ACLU locals. The app also allows users to text videos to family and private lawyers.


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Cherokee Nation Brings Booming Technology to Language Efforts | New https://softwave.info/cherokee-nation-brings-booming-technology-to-language-efforts-new/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://softwave.info/cherokee-nation-brings-booming-technology-to-language-efforts-new/ TAHLEQUAH – In honor of Sequoyah and this year’s bicentennial celebration of the Cherokee syllabary, the Cherokee Nation became the first Native American tribe to use motion and face capture technology to help preserve and promote a language native. In conjunction with the Tribe Language Program, Cherokee Nation Film Office and Original Content today presented […]]]>

TAHLEQUAH – In honor of Sequoyah and this year’s bicentennial celebration of the Cherokee syllabary, the Cherokee Nation became the first Native American tribe to use motion and face capture technology to help preserve and promote a language native.

In conjunction with the Tribe Language Program, Cherokee Nation Film Office and Original Content today presented “Sequoyah: Voice of the Inventor for the Bicentennial”.

“Through the use of this cutting edge technology and the incredible efforts of our native speakers, we are perpetuating the Cherokee language for many generations to come,” said Chief Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Chuck Hoskin Jr. ” For 200 years, Sequoyah’s invention of the Cherokee syllabary has truly moved our people forward, and it continues to move us forward today through new and innovative technological breakthroughs.

Filmed on the virtual soundstage of the Cherokee Nation’s Covid Response, the production brings Sequoyah to life through real-time graphics and the voice and movement of native Cherokee speaker Steve Daugherty.

“Cherokee Nation has brought cutting-edge programming, infrastructure and technology to Oklahoma,” said Jennifer Loren, director of the Cherokee Nation Film Office and Original Content. “Cherokee Nation’s COVID Response Virtual Soundstage features unique content creation tools that have never been available in the Indian country before. This virtual production is a first of its kind among tribal nations and a great example of how emerging technology can help us preserve and share Indigenous languages.

The tribe’s virtual video production implements a combination of video game engine and motion and face capture technology using a combination of motion capture and headset to record body movements. , facial expressions and language. Using a live renderer, the recorded data was then used to create a digital character walking and talking about Sequoyah.

The production was created using Unreal Engine, the same technology used for major industry productions such as “The Mandalorian” and popular video games such as Fortnite.

Sequoyah, also known as George Guess or George Gist, introduced the Cherokee syllabary in 1821. The revered Cherokee statesman and linguist invented the first written language among Native American tribes and influenced written languages ​​throughout the world.

For more information and to watch “Sequoyah: Voice of the Inventor for the Bicentennial”, visit https://anadisgoi.com/index.php/culture-stories/724-cherokee-nation-brings-burgeoning-technology-to-language-efforts. Behind-the-scenes photos and videos are also available.


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The majority (55.5%) were also concerned about the confidentiality of medical records, DNA data and facial images collected for precision health research – ScienceDaily https://softwave.info/the-majority-55-5-were-also-concerned-about-the-confidentiality-of-medical-records-dna-data-and-facial-images-collected-for-precision-health-research-sciencedaily/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:50:25 +0000 https://softwave.info/the-majority-55-5-were-also-concerned-about-the-confidentiality-of-medical-records-dna-data-and-facial-images-collected-for-precision-health-research-sciencedaily/ The uses of facial images and facial recognition technologies – to unlock a phone or for airport security – are increasingly common in everyday life. But what do people think of the use of this data in healthcare and biomedical research? By interviewing more than 4,000 American adults, the researchers found that a significant proportion […]]]>

The uses of facial images and facial recognition technologies – to unlock a phone or for airport security – are increasingly common in everyday life. But what do people think of the use of this data in healthcare and biomedical research?

By interviewing more than 4,000 American adults, the researchers found that a significant proportion of those surveyed considered the use of facial image data in healthcare in eight different scenarios to be unacceptable (15-25 percent). Taken with those who responded that they were unsure whether the uses were acceptable, around 30-50% of respondents indicated some degree of concern regarding the use of facial recognition technologies in healthcare scenarios. While the use of facial image data in some cases – for example to avoid medical errors, for diagnosis and screening, or for safety – was acceptable to the majority, more than half of respondents did not agree not or were uncertain about the use of this data by health care providers. to monitor patient emotions or symptoms, or for health research.

In biomedical research, most respondents were also concerned about the use of medical records, DNA data, and facial image data in a study.

While respondents were a diverse group in terms of age, geographic region, gender, racial and ethnic origin, education level, household income, and political opinions, their views on these issues did not differ by demographic data. The results were published in the journal PLOS ONE.

“Our results show that a large portion of the public perceives a potential threat to privacy when it comes to using facial image data in healthcare,” said lead author Sara Katsanis, who heads the Genetics and Justice Lab at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital. of Chicago and is an Assistant Research Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “To ensure public trust, we need to consider better protections for personal information in healthcare facilities, whether it’s medical records, DNA data or facial images. As facial recognition technologies become more mainstream, we must be prepared to explain how patient and participant data will be kept private and secure. “

Lead author Jennifer K. Wagner, assistant professor of law, policy, and engineering at Penn State’s School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs adds: research to think about humans in more meaningful ways. The research we are conducting will hopefully help policymakers find ways to facilitate biomedical innovation in a thoughtful and responsible way that does not undermine public trust.

The research team, which includes co-authors with expertise in bioethics, law, genomics, facial analysis and bioinformatics, hope to conduct further research to understand the nuances where public trust is lacking.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago. Note: Content can be changed for style and length.


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What is AI called in your native language? https://softwave.info/what-is-ai-called-in-your-native-language/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 05:33:28 +0000 https://softwave.info/what-is-ai-called-in-your-native-language/ Register for Data & Analytics Conclave>> Over the past few years, the conversation around emerging technologies such as AI and machine learning has grown significantly. However, this conversation is limited only to the research and developer community. The general public, which is the recipient, is largely excluded from these conversations. This is mainly because there […]]]>
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Over the past few years, the conversation around emerging technologies such as AI and machine learning has grown significantly. However, this conversation is limited only to the research and developer community. The general public, which is the recipient, is largely excluded from these conversations. This is mainly because there has been very little effort to give a cultural and linguistic context to these technologies. To give an example, most of us might not know what AI is called in our local language or worse; there may not be a local term for AI to begin with.

Recognizing this problem, Asvatha Babu, a doctoral student in the School of Communication at American University, studied the interplay between technology, media, governance and the public. Analytics India Magazine caught up with Asvatha for a detailed conversation.

Asvatha Babu

Edited excerpts from the interview:

OBJECTIVE: What are the challenges of translating technological terms / concepts into a local cultural context?

Asvatha Babu: I am a doctoral student at the School of Communication at American University; I did my master’s at the same university, focusing on cybersecurity and technology policy. I worked briefly on blockchain and its use to create social impact (for example, its possible use in the Aadhaar system). A series of events and further research interested me in facial recognition technology (FRT).

My current thesis work focuses on FRT and its use in solving major social and humanitarian problems. As part of my thesis work, I interacted with the police and understood how they use these technologies (currently, in the context of Tamil Nadu). In addition, I am also trying to understand the attitude of the police towards this technology and if it really helps them to make their job easier or to add more burden.

Another aspect of my research is to understand the general attitude of society towards FRT – what they think and talk about it. So when we say FRT, we are culturally building several things under that umbrella. In order to understand the cultural implications of FRT, I study the media coverage around this technology. For example, I realized that even though the police in Tamil Nadu have been using the FRT for three years, they don’t really have a name in the local language (Tamil).

There are so many ways to translate the term facial recognition to express the purpose of technology. This is what journalists do to report on FRT in the local language. For this reason, there is a tendency to talk about FRT in a more functional way (what it does and why it is needed). This approach is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, this translation makes FRT appear very contextualized, which is good. But on the other hand, my study shows that such an approach also leads to media coverage of the FRT from the perspective of the police / authorities. This means that there is less emphasis on critical analysis of such a tool.

OBJECTIVE: What can be done to improve understanding of technologies such as FRT, especially through appropriate and contextual translations?

Asvatha Babu: Much more attention needs to be paid to the translation process. There are some very good research organizations, civil society organizations and think tanks working on the concept of facial recognition and surveillance in India, algorithmic surveillance, digital rights and data privacy. But there is a lack of focus on translation at the local level. It is important to study how the technology is translated or how it is constructed locally in a specific language. So for the first step, I think we need to pay more attention to it.

In the second step, there needs to be more engagement with linguistics such as academics in language studies, digital rights specialists, as well as people who study the effect or impact of these technologies, as well as justice. social and social rights like think tanks and organizations. There needs to be more engagement between them and the engineering community. Currently, translation software is created by larger organizations like Google and used by authorities like the police. There is a lack of critical voices. We’re missing all that perspective that needs to be there for people to understand technology for what it is and for the media to cover it more fully.

OBJECTIVE: How good is software like Google Translate with regard to technical translation at the local level?

Asvatha Babu: I think any future where we have to rely on companies like Google to do translation work for us is not a future where I see some kind of emphasis on justice or rights-based types of translation, because their translation services are built with the goal of being used more and being more profitable as a product.

To this end, the New Zealand tribal group is fighting to keep its Maori language alive without interference from large conglomerates like Google. They understand that once the tech giants have access to this language, they (the tribe) will let go of any sense of contractual ownership of this language. Companies like Google, Microsoft or IBM don’t care about the language as such; they’re interested in the concept of having that language in their arsenal, so more people need to rely on these companies. So the tribe is now building their own automation process. There are other ways to automate the translation process that shouldn’t depend on these big, profit-driven tech companies.

See also


PURPOSE: Given the risk of surveillance and breach of privacy technologies like FRT, campaigners believe they should be banned altogether. What is your opinion ?

Asvatha Babu: Yes, this is a major concern – pros vs. cons and the real cost of benefits.

To begin with, surveillance has always existed; people have always looked at others, especially in the context of, for example, a public health problem or in prisons. There is always this notion of having to watch your comrades or subordinates for public safety, etc. Today, the availability of information, processing prowess, and the entry of private tech companies trying to take advantage of it have made surveillance even more advanced.

It is important to consider two perspectives here. The first is that we already live in a hostile society where there is an asymmetry of power between the authorities and the public. The development of more advanced surveillance tools would further exacerbate this asymmetry. So – any amount is too much.

The second perspective, often adopted by authorities and those who develop such technologies, is that it makes life easier and enables the police to better serve the public and increase public safety and security.

These technologies cannot be eliminated or canceled. On our side (engineers, developers, media and authorities), we have to make sure that people are sufficiently educated about these technologies and their effects in a more cultural context.


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Herald’s ‘Mobile ID Choice’ digital driver’s license https://softwave.info/heralds-mobile-id-choice-digital-drivers-license/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 08:00:10 +0000 https://softwave.info/heralds-mobile-id-choice-digital-drivers-license/ It’s time to ditch the plastic, that is, if you want to. Trulioo Senior Vice President of Identity Solutions Garient Evans told PYMNTS that the big digital shift creates a range of options for those of us who want to embrace digital IDs – or keep our old paper and plastic documents in the proverbial […]]]>

It’s time to ditch the plastic, that is, if you want to.

Trulioo Senior Vice President of Identity Solutions Garient Evans told PYMNTS that the big digital shift creates a range of options for those of us who want to embrace digital IDs – or keep our old paper and plastic documents in the proverbial leather wallet.

The conversation came weeks after Apple said residents of eight U.S. states could add their driver’s licenses or state IDs to their Apple wallets on their iPhones and Apple Watches in the future. Licenses based on digital wallet or state IDs can be used at participating airports during initial deployments.

Although he said the announcement “may have caught people’s attention,” the trends behind the initiative have been in place for some time. The general concept is that parts of a person’s identity can live on their phone – and allow that channel to serve as a means of accessing products and services.

Smartphones at the center of everything

To see how this concept is spreading, he highlighted the use of boarding passes downloaded to phones, rendered and presented digitally at the gate. More and more, we are avoiding the paper passes and plastic documents that we once had to wield to help us get through the day.

Overall, he said, “there are more and more consumers saying, ‘I don’t need a physical wallet. I have all my payment methods on my phone – and now my ID on my phone too. ‘”

Digital identifiers, he said, can be particularly useful in ensuring that individuals are old enough to walk into a bar and purchase alcohol or tobacco.

But is it sure?

Security is also enhanced with digital identifiers, which present “only” the information needed, he said. A digital ID, for example, can offer a simple “yes” or “no” determination to verify that a person has passed the age thresholds of 18 or 21 without disclosing more details than that. This level of security is way ahead of the handing over of a plastic ID, where many other sensitive details can be viewed by bad actors.

Do a simple Google search, Evans said, and you will be able to find domestic and international counterfeiters who will create a high-quality fake version of a government-issued ID, complete with size, eye color, date of birth and other characteristics.

By nature, digital driver’s licenses are more secure and can take advantage of encryption and other advanced technologies to ensure that data is not exposed more than necessary depending on the use case.

Ultimately, according to the vendor, digital identities could be linked to digital keys that can unlock home and garage doors. Gone are the days of the “Batman utility belt” where keys, wallets and a range of gadgets are needed to gain access to his home or workplace, he said.

“You’re never really far from your phone – and your phone is always charged,” he said, adding that devices are ubiquitous across all demographics, so it makes sense that the phone is used to the point. access and entry, and to confirm high and low value transactions. Delivery drivers may be able to ping a customer’s phone and confirm that customer’s location – and, indeed, that they are who they say they are.

With a nod to high value transactions, he said the same digital ID can be used to apply for student loans or refinance his home.

Old habits die hard

In the future, vendors are sure to fight for part of the digital ID field. It may be some time before we see standards and protocols governing how credentials should be created and maintained. The government has an opportunity to step in and help clarify technical details and risk tolerance, he said. Legislation in this space, as with the Digital Identity Enhancement Act of 2021, can help accelerate that consensus, “which in turn will help innovators understand what the expectations are.”

As he told PYMNTS: “We live in an age of options, and the digital driver’s license is going to be a convenient way for us to let go of the wallet. But it may not be mandatory or inevitable for those of us who love the feel of plastic and wallets. There will probably always be the option of having that plastic license. “

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NEW PYMNTS DATA: DIGITAL BANKING STUDY – THE BATTLE OF BREWING FOR WHERE WE WILL BANK

On: Forty-seven percent of U.S. consumers avoid digital-only banks due to data security concerns, despite considerable interest in these services. In Digital Banking: The Brewing Battle For Where We Will Bank, PYMNTS surveyed over 2,200 consumers to reveal how digital-only banks can boost privacy and security while providing convenient services to meet this unmet demand.


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The CIA venture capital firm https://softwave.info/the-cia-venture-capital-firm/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 06:59:21 +0000 https://softwave.info/the-cia-venture-capital-firm/ Usually the securities surrounding how the encrypted messaging platform Wickr has secured over $ 1.6 million in funding wouldn’t be something we would take note of, let alone cover in an editorial sense. Wickr’s funding source, however, is gaining more attention from several publications, not just BH. You see, the public disclosure records reviewed by […]]]>

Usually the securities surrounding how the encrypted messaging platform Wickr has secured over $ 1.6 million in funding wouldn’t be something we would take note of, let alone cover in an editorial sense. Wickr’s funding source, however, is gaining more attention from several publications, not just BH. You see, the public disclosure records reviewed by Motherboard states that Wickr is funded by a nonprofit investment firm called In-Q-Tel – otherwise known as a venture capital firm created by the Central Intelligence Agency to “support US intelligence capabilities” and ” provide advanced technologies that meet national security needs. ”

Record the moment of scratching. Since when does the CIA have an entire branch dedicated to the distribution of seed capital? More importantly, how does it work? In this case, In-Q-Tel – formerly known as Peleus before changing its name with a direct reference to James Bond’s own quartermaster (yes … really) – was founded by former CIA Director George Tenet, former Lockheed CEO Martin Norm Augustine and veteran venture capitalist Gilman Louie in 1999.

And while the idea of ​​a CIA venture capital firm immediately blows our neurons with punchlines about “investing” rocket launchers into the brave Mujahedin fighters of Afghanistan, to cede ████ █████ ███ ████, not only is there some degree of separation – In-Q-Tel involves non-combative R&D pathways (as far as we have been told ); and is in fact regarded by the industry as a forerunner in the field of information technology. Apparently, the average dollar invested by In-Q-Tel in 2016 attracted $ 15 from third-party investors.



RELATED: CIA travel tips for spies

“While we are paying the bills, In-Q-Tel is independent from the CIA,” says George Tenet.

“The CIA identifies pressing problems and In-Q-Tel provides the technology to solve them. The In-Q-Tel alliance has brought the Agency back to the cutting edge of technology.

“This collaboration allowed the CIA to take advantage of the technology used by Las Vegas to identify corrupt card players and apply it to link analysis for terrorists … and adapt the technology used by bookstores online and convert it to browse millions of pages of documents looking for unexpected results.

You would be surprised at the overlap between espionage and civilian applications when it comes to technology that is firmly in In-Q-Tel’s attention. For example, in the early 2000s, the venture capital arm of the CIA decided to fund a satellite mapping software operation known as Keyhole, Inc. This same operation would later be acquired by Google and renamed Google. Earth. On November 15, 2005, In-Q-Tel sold the 5,636 Google shares received as part of this acquisition for more than $ 2.2 million.

Although everything works partially in public, the products owned by In-Q-Tel and the way in which they are used are strictly confidential; although it’s painfully obvious that the primary focus is data processing, communication, and just about anything that you can tap into to focus on the exact location of a person of interest. According to The Washington Post, “Virtually any American entrepreneur, inventor, or researcher working on ways to analyze data has likely received a phone call from In-Q-Tel or at least been Googled by its team of tech watchers. “

RELATED: Former CIA officers reveal 5 signs someone is lying



“There’s GitLab, the software development platform that is planning a $ 10 billion IPO later this year,” says Kevin T. Dugan of Fortune.

“There’s Palantir, Peter Thiel’s analytics firm, cybersecurity giant FireEye, cloud firm Cockroach Labs, and Internet of Things firm Swam Technologies. ”

“The CIA-backed company doesn’t list all of its investments – Wickr isn’t on the site, for what it’s worth – and doesn’t say whether it still has a stake, but it’s still a long list. “

At the end of 2020, In-Q-Tel had US $ 625 million (AU $ 850.9 million) in assets. Here’s a list of some of In-Q-Tel’s investments below – and you can check out (most of) its current portfolio. here.

Software

  • MemSQL – distributed, in-memory SQL database management system for real-time analysis
  • Keyhole, Inc – geospatial visualization application (acquired by Google in 2004 and will become Google Earth in 2005)
  • Boundless Spatial – geospatial software
  • Huddle – cloud-based content collaboration software
  • Oculis Labs – visual cybersecurity solutions
  • Recipient – training simulation for FPS games
  • GeoIQ FortiusOne – visualization on maps
  • Forterra – virtual worlds for training
  • Quantum4D – visualization technology
  • Visual sciences – visual analysis in real time
  • Spotfire – analysis of visualization data
  • Algorithmics – infrastructure for deploying and scaling AI / ML models
  • Palantir Technologies – data integration, search and discovery, knowledge management and secure collaboration
  • PiXlogic – visual search
  • Agent Logic – event detection and response software – Webspector web page modification software
  • ArcSight – secure software
  • Zaplet – e-mail
  • Authentica – secure messaging and secure document sharing
  • Teradici Enterprise – desktop virtualization
  • Connect – Wi-Fi and VPN
  • SafeWeb PrivacyMatrix – navigation
  • Visible technologies – social media watch
  • Silver Tail Systems – Website Fraud Prevention
  • InnoCentive – crowdsourcing sites
  • Fetch Technologies – Internet data management (bots and RSS)
  • SRA OrionMagic – CMS Software
  • Saved future – web intelligence & predictive analysis
  • Traction software – Web 2.0
  • Internet Evidence Finder – digital forensic tool
  • Core technology – multilingual text analysis and cybercrime
  • Tongue weaver – automatic language translation
  • Lingotek – Translation services
  • Cassatt – desktop software
  • Tacit knowledge systems – internal software
  • FMS – analysis, visualization and knowledge base for the Federal Intelligence Community
  • Initiate Systems – real-time multiple database software
  • TerraGo – GeoPDF geolocation applications and software
  • Geosemble – unstructured data analysis and geospatial software
  • NovoDynamics – Recognition of Arabic characters
  • ADApx – Microsoft Office and GIS
  • Numerical reasoning – Synthesys v3.0 – review facts and associations at a glance
  • Minor Appeal – telephone speech analysis software
  • Carnegie Speech – speech recognition
  • AzTE]PRISM – handwriting recognition
  • A4Vision – 3D facial imaging
  • SRD – identity resolution software
  • Inktomi Corp – network infrastructure software
  • Mohomine mohoClassifier – organize mass data
  • Stratify – organize bulk data
  • Below – search for data repositories
  • Inxight – search engine
  • Will suit RetrievalWare – search engine
  • MetaCarta – search engine
  • Intensity – search engine
  • Platform – analysis and visualization of big data
  • Intelliseek – search engine
  • FireEye – protection against malware
  • ReversingLabs – malware detection and analysis
  • zSpace (company) – 3D holographic imaging screens
  • Socrates – Open data solutions for government innovation
  • Interset – Security analysis / user behavior analysis
  • Nozomi Networks – OT & IoT Security and Visibility
  • D2iQ (formerly Mesosphere) – Apache Mesos & Kubernetes consulting firm
  • Fuel3D – 3D scanning
  • TRX Systems – 3D Mapping

Material science

biotechnology

  • Biomatrica – storage of biolab tech anhydrobiosis
  • SpectraFluidics – detection of traces of airborne chemicals
  • Arcxis Biotechnologies – sample processing and pathogen detection
  • febit group – DNA
  • Boreal genomics – Genetic fingerprints
  • T2 Biosystems – medical diagnostic devices, miniaturized magnetic resonance (MR)
  • OpGen – microbial genome analysis
  • Infobionics – biotechnology cellular database
  • Microchip Biotechnologies – analytical instrumentation for biodefense
  • Cambrios Technologies – biomaterials for semiconductor electronics
  • Seahawk Biosystems – diagnostic biosensor products
  • Sionex – chemical and biological sensors
  • Polychromix – materials analysis and chemical detection
  • IatroQuest – detect biological and chemical agents
  • IntegenX – NanoBioProcessor & molecular diagnostics
  • Seventh Sense Biosystems – health monitoring and medical diagnostics
  • Sonitus Medical – transmits sound through the teeth
  • MedShape – braces made from shape memory materials

Electricity

  • Electro energy – nickel-metal hydride batteries for satellites and airplanes
  • Qynergy Corporation – long life batteries, micro-electro-mechanical systems
  • Infinite Power Solutions – micro-batteries
  • Skybuilt Power – solar, wind, fuel cells, batteries, fossil fuels, telecommunications (Mobile Power Station 3.5 kW to 150 kW)
  • Semprius – solar energy
  • AdaptivEnergy – miniature piezo generators
  • Power Assure – management of power consumption
  • MiserWare – reduces energy

Electronic

Video

Infrastructure

Equipment

  • Xanadu quantum technologies – photonic quantum computers
  • Tyfone[22] – digital security for mobility, cloud and IoT
  • Genia Photonics – fiber optic products
  • Advanced Photonix, Inc. – optical fiber
  • SitScape – Command and control room hardware
  • SpotterRF – micro surveillance radar
  • QD Vision – monitors, displays and lighting
  • GATR Technologies – inflatable satellite dishes
  • CoreStreet – door access control systems
  • Redlen Technologies – X-ray and gamma CZT detectors
  • Etherstack – radios
  • Paratek microwave – smart scanning antennas
  • D-Wave Systems – quantum computers

Sensor networks

  • ThingMagic – RFID
  • Dust networks – low power wireless mesh network systems
  • Ember Society – ZigBee – wireless semiconductor
  • Gainspan – Low consumption Wi-Fi
  • Tendril Networks – software for wireless sensor and control networks
  • TenXsys – telemetry systems for remote monitoring, NASA
  • StreamBase – real-time data in government / military networks, RFID / sensors
  • Thetus – software for remote sensing instruments
  • Soflinx Defender – Wireless sensor network for fences
  • PlateScan – Automatic License Plate Recognition (ALPR) Sensor Network

Data centers

  • Bay Microsystems – packet processing and data traffic
  • Cleversafe – Data storage clouds and massive digital archives
  • Cloudera – data storage and analysis
  • Asankya – hypermesh data flow
  • CopperEye – data retention
  • Systems research and development – real-time data warehousing
  • Network device – Decru (network data storage)

Security tests


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Mashreq NEO to become UAE’s first digital bank to use facial recognition for account opening https://softwave.info/mashreq-neo-to-become-uaes-first-digital-bank-to-use-facial-recognition-for-account-opening/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 06:09:54 +0000 https://softwave.info/mashreq-neo-to-become-uaes-first-digital-bank-to-use-facial-recognition-for-account-opening/ Mashreq NEO, the full-service digital bank of UAE lender Mashreq Bank, announced on October 12 that it will allow residents to easily open a bank account using facial recognition technology. The initiative, launched in collaboration with the UAE Ministry of Interior, builds on the ministry’s existing facial recognition verification system, which uses technology to validate […]]]>

Mashreq NEO, the full-service digital bank of UAE lender Mashreq Bank, announced on October 12 that it will allow residents to easily open a bank account using facial recognition technology.

The initiative, launched in collaboration with the UAE Ministry of Interior, builds on the ministry’s existing facial recognition verification system, which uses technology to validate and authenticate the legitimate holder of the official document in time. real against government databases in order to guard against fraud.

This process, in turn, allows customers to securely open their new accounts.

From early November 2021, new Mashreq NEO customers will be able to access banking services by scanning their Emirates ID and using their face as the primary authentication method; eliminating the need to visit a bank branch, a statement said. However, to open a Mashreq Neo account, customers can scan their Emirates ID by typing it on their smartphone, confirm details and take a selfie.

Fernando Morillo, Senior Executive Vice President, Group Head of Retail Banking, Mashreq Bank, said: “By capitalizing on the latest facial recognition technology, our clients’ identities will be instantly verified using artificial intelligence. , thus providing our customers with a convenient and transparent experience. without compromising the security of their data.

“The service builds on the UAE’s leading digital agenda, and in the Mashreq we see biometric technologies like this playing a bigger role in the future as customers look for secure ways but practices to conduct their financial transactions and enjoy a superior customer experience. “

Mashreq Bank and Oracle Financial Services also collaborated to modernize the financial institution’s banking capabilities. Mashreq would implement Oracle’s Transaction Banking platform to provide solutions for digital banking, payments, trade finance, liquidity management and virtual accounts.

Read: UAE Mashreq To Use Oracle’s Transaction Banking Platform

Last year, the Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC) and Mashreq launched a blockchain data sharing platform to speed up the ease of opening digital bank accounts.

Read more: Dubai DIFC and Mashreq Bank launch bank account opening with KYC blockchain platform


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